Role of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are highly specialized endothelial cells localized at the interface between the blood derived from the gut and the adipose tissue on the one side, and other liver cells on the other side...
PUBLISHED IN: J Hepatol 2019;70:1278-1291.

Commentary

Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are highly specialized endothelial cells localized at the interface between the blood derived from the gut and the adipose tissue on the one side, and other liver cells on the other side. In physiological conditions, LSECs are gatekeepers of liver homeostasis. LSECs display anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic properties by preventing Kupffer cell and hepatic stellate cell activation and regulating intrahepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure. Lipotoxicity and inflammation induce endothelial inflammation. Activated LSECs release cytokines and chemokines and over-express adhesion molecules, thus sustaining liver inflammation. Altered LSECs also fail to maintain hepatic stellate cell quiescence and release fibrogenic mediators, including Hedgehog signalling molecules, promoting liver fibrosis. Liver angiogenesis is increased in NAFLD and contributes to liver inflammation and fibrosis, but also to hepatocellular carcinoma development.

Share the article
Dr. D. Beard

Dr. D. Beard

Articles: 189

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER TO GET THE LATEST UPDATES