Short sleep duration is a risk of incident nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a population-based longitudinal study.

Previous cross-sectional studies revealed that short sleep duration has a close relationship with the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This historical cohort study of 12,306 participants is the first study...
PUBLISHED IN: J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2019;28:73-81.

Commentary

Previous cross-sectional studies revealed that short sleep duration has a close relationship with the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This historical cohort study of 12,306 participants is the first study showing that short sleep duration was a risk factor for incident NAFLD.

During the 7-year follow-up, 2,280 participants developed NAFLD. In Cox proportional hazards models, sleep duration of ≤5 h in both men and women were revealed to be a significant risk for incident NAFLD, compared to men and women with a sleep duration of >7 h (men: hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 1.13-1.72, p=0.002; women; 1.46, 1.05-2.04, p=0.023).

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Dr. D. Beard

Dr. D. Beard

Articles: 190

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